A Rebuttal To The Apology Tour

A reader of this blog, Nancy, left a comment on the previous post but was unable to put what follows into comments.  I have added some background, and you will be able to find more pics here.

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20 Examples of American Arrogance

In alphabetical order

Just Europe

1. The American Cemetery at Aisne-Marne, France

2289 Americans

We Apologize.

aisne-marne-cemetary

The 42.5-acre Aisne-Marne Cemetery and Memorial in France, its headstones lying in a sweeping curve, sits at the foot of the hill where stands Belleau Wood. The cemetery contains the graves of 2,289 war dead, most of whom fought in the vicinity and in the Marne valley in the summer of 1918. The memorial chapel sits on a hillside, decorated with sculptured and stained-glass details of wartime personnel, equipment and insignia. Inscribed on its interior wall are 1,060 names of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. During World War II, the chapel was damaged slightly by an enemy shell.

2. The American Cemetery at Ardennes, Belgium

5329 Americans

We are arrogant.

ardennes-cemetary

The 90-acre cemetery contains the graves of 5,329 of our military dead, many of whom died in the 1944 Ardennes winter offensive (Battle of the Bulge). The headstones are aligned in straight rows that form a Greek cross on the lawns and are framed by tree masses. The cemetery served as the location of the Central Identification Point for the American Graves Registration Service of the War Department during much of the life of the Service.

3. The American Cemetery at Brittany, France .

4410 Americans

Excuse us.

brittany-france

The Brittany American Cemetery and Memorial in France covers 28 acres of rolling farm country near the eastern edge of Brittany and contains the remains of 4,410 of our war dead, most of whom lost their lives in the Normandy and Brittany campaigns of 1944. Along the retaining wall of the memorial terrace are inscribed the names of 498 of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The gray granite memorial, containing the chapel as well as two large operations maps with narratives and flags of our military services, overlooks the burial area. Stained glass and sculpture embellish the structure. The lookout platform of the tower, reached by 98 steps, affords a view of the stately pattern of the headstones, as well as of the peaceful surrounding countryside stretching northward to the sea and Mont St. Michel. The cemetery is located on the site of the temporary American St. James Cemetery, established on August 4, 1944 by the U.S. Third Army. It marks the point where the American forces made their breakthrough from the hedgerow country of Normandy into the plains of Brittany during the offensive around Avranches.

4. Brookwood, England American Cemetery

468 Americans

brookwood-england

The 4.5 acre Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial in England lies to the west of the large civilian cemetery built by the London Necropolis Co. and contains the graves of 468 of our military dead. Close by are military cemeteries and monuments of the British Commonwealth and other allied nations. Automobiles may drive through the Commonwealth or civilian cemeteries to the American cemetery.

Within the American cemetery the headstones are arranged in four plots, grouped about the flagpole. The regular rows of white marble headstones on the smooth lawn are framed by masses of shrubs and evergreen trees which form a perfect setting for the chapel, a classic white stone building on the north end of the cemetery. The interior of the chapel is of tan-hued stone. Small stained-glass windows light the altar and flags and the carved cross above them. On the walls within the chapel are inscribed the names of 563 of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

5.Cambridge,England

3812 Americans

cambridge-cemetary

The Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial site in England, 30.5 acres in total, was donated by the University of Cambridge. It lies on a slope with the west and south sides framed by woodland. The cemetery contains the remains of 3,812 of our military dead; 5,127 names are recorded on the Tablets of the Missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. Most died in the Battle of the Atlantic or in the strategic air bombardment of northwest Europe.

6.Epinal, France American Cemetery

5525 Americans

epinal-france-cemetary

The Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial in France, 48.6 acres in extent, is sited on a plateau 100 feet above the Moselle River in the foothills of the Vosges Mountains. It contains the graves of 5,255 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the campaigns across northeastern France to the Rhine and beyond into Germany. The cemetery was established in October 1944 by the 46th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company of the U.S. Seventh Army as it drove northward from southern France through the Rhone Valley into Germany. The cemetery became the repository for the fatalities in the bitter fighting through the Heasbourg Gap during the winter of 1944-45.

The memorial, a rectangular structure with two large bas-relief panels, consists of a chapel, portico, and map room with a mosaic operations map. On the walls of the Court of Honor, which surround the memorial, are inscribed the names of 424 of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. Stretching northward is a wide, tree-lined mall that separates the two large burial plots. At the northern end of the mall, the circular flagpole plaza forms an overlook affording a view of a wide sweep of the Moselle Valley.

On May 12, 1958, thirteen caskets draped with American flags were placed side by side at the memorial. Each casket contained the remains of one World War II Unknown American, one from each of the thirteen permanent American military cemeteries in the European Theater of Operations. In a solemn ceremony, General Edward J. O’Neill, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Communication Zone, Europe, selected the Unknown to represent the European Theater. It was flown to Naples, Italy and placed with Unknowns from the Atlantic and Pacific Theaters of Operation aboard the USS Blandy for transportation to Washington, D.C. for final selection of the Unknown from World War II. On Memorial Day, 1958, the remains were buried alongside the Unknown from World War I at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.

7.Flanders Field, Belgium

368 Americans

flanders-field

The Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium occupies a 6.2-acre site. Masses of graceful trees and shrubbery frame the burial area and screen it from passing traffic. At the ends of the paths leading to three of the corners of the cemetery are circular retreats, with benches and urns. At this peaceful site rest 368 of our military dead, most of whom gave their lives in liberating the soil of Belgium in World War I. Their headstones are aligned in four symmetrical areas around the white stone chapel that stands in the center of the cemetery.

8.Florence, Italy

4402 Americans

florence-italy-cemetary

The Florence American Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy covers 70 acres, chiefly on the west side of the Greve “torrente.” The wooded hills that frame its west limit rise several hundred feet. Between the two entrance buildings, a bridge leads to the burial area where the headstones of 4,402 of our military dead are arrayed in symmetrical curved rows upon the hillside. They represent 39 percent of the U.S. Fifth Army burials originally made between Rome and the Alps. Most died in the fighting that occurred after the capture of Rome in June 1944. Included among them are casualties of the heavy fighting in the Apennines shortly before the war’s end. On May 2, 1945, the enemy troops in northern Italy surrendered.

9.Henri-Chapelle, Belgium

7992 Americans

henri-chapelle-cemetary

At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the reservation. West of the highway an overlook affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield.

To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of our forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers.

The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army’s drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the U.S. for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgium citizens attending along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans.

10.Lorraine,France

10,489 Americans

lorraine-cemetary

The Lorraine American Cemetery and Memorial in France covers 113.5 acres and contains the largest number of graves of our military dead of World War II in Europe, a total of 10,489. Their headstones are arranged in nine plots in a generally elliptical design extending over the beautiful rolling terrain of eastern Lorraine and culminating in a prominent overlook feature. Most of the dead here were killed while driving the German forces from the fortress city of Metz toward the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River. Initially, there were over 16,000 Americans interred in the St. Avold region, mostly from the U.S. Seventh Army’s Infantry and Armored Divisions and its Cavalry Groups. St. Avold served as a vital communications center for the vast network of enemy defenses guarding the western border of the Third Reich.

11.Luxembourg, Luxembourg

5076 Americans

luxembourg-cemetary

The Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial, 50.5 acres in extent, is situated in a beautiful wooded area. The cemetery was established on December 29, 1944 by the 609th Quartermaster Company of the U.S. Third Army while Allied Forces were stemming the enemy’s desperate Ardennes Offensive, one of the critical battles of World War II. The city of Luxembourg served as headquarters for General George S. Patton’s U.S. Third Army. General Patton is buried here.

Not far from the cemetery entrance stands the white stone chapel, set on a wide circular platform surrounded by woods. It is embellished with sculpture in bronze and stone, a stained-glass window with American unit insignia, and a mosaic ceiling. Flanking the chapel at a lower level are two large stone pylons upon which are maps made of various inlaid granites, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of the American armed forces in this region. On the same pylons are inscribed the names of 371 of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

Sloping gently downhill from the memorial is the burial area containing 5,076 of our military dead, many of whom lost their lives in the “Battle of the Bulge” and in the advance to the Rhine. Their headstones follow graceful curves; trees, fountains and flower beds contribute to the dignity of the ensemble.

12. Meuse-Argonne

14,246 Americans

meuse-argonne-cemetary

Within the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial in France, which covers 130.5 acres, rest the largest number of our military dead in Europe, a total of 14,246. Most of those buried here lost their lives during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive of World War I. The immense array of headstones rises in long regular rows upward beyond a wide central pool to the chapel that crowns the ridge. A beautiful bronze screen separates the chapel foyer from the interior, which is decorated with stained-glass windows portraying American unit insignia; behind the altar are flags of the principal Allied nations.

On either side of the chapel are memorial loggias. One panel of the west loggia contains a map of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Inscribed on the remaining panels of both loggias are Tablets of the Missing with 954 names, including those from the U.S. expedition to northern Russia in 1918-1919. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

13.Netherlands, Netherlands

8301 Americans

netherlands-cemetary

The World War II Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial is the only American military cemetery in the Netherlands. The cemetery site has a rich historical background, lying near the famous Cologne-Boulogne highway built by the Romans and used by Caesar during his campaign in that area. The highway was also used by Charlemagne, Charles V, Napoleon, and Kaiser Wilhelm II. In May 1940, Hitler’s legions advanced over the route of the old Roman highway, overwhelming the Low Countries. In September 1944, German troops once more used the highway for their withdrawal from the countries occupied for four years.

The cemetery’s tall memorial tower can be seen before reaching the site, which covers 65.5 acres. From the cemetery entrance the visitor is led to the Court of Honor with its pool reflecting the tower. At the base of the tower facing the reflecting pool is a statue representing a mother grieving her lost son. To the right and left, respectively, are the Visitor Building and the map room containing three large, engraved operations maps with texts depicting the military operations of the American armed forces. Stretching along the sides of the court are Tablets of the Missing on which are recorded 1,722 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

Within the tower is a chapel. The light fixture in the chapel and the altar candelabra and flower bowl were presented by the government of the Netherlands and by the local Provincial administration. Beyond the tower is a burial area divided into 16 plots, where rest 8,301 of our military dead, their headstones set in long curves. A wide, tree-lined mall leads to the flagstaff that crowns the crest.

14.Normandy, France

9387 Americans

normandy

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 and the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its ½ mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,387 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

15.Oise-Aisne, France

6012 Americans

oise-aisne-cemetery

The Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial in France contains the remains of 6,012 American war dead, most of whom lost their lives while fighting in this vicinity in 1918 during the First World War. Their headstones, aligned in long rows on the 36.5-acre site, rise in a gentle slope from the entrance to the memorial at the far end. The burial area is divided into four plots by wide paths lined by trees and beds of roses; at the intersection are a circular plaza and the flagpole.

16.Rhone, France

861 Americans

rhone-cemetery

The site of the Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial in France was selected because of its historic location along the route of the U.S. Seventh Army’s drive up the Rhone Valley. It was established on August 19, 1944 after the Seventh Army’s surprise landing in southern France.

On 12.5 acres at the foot of a hill clad with the characteristic cypresses, olive trees, and oleanders of southern France rest 861 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the liberation of southern France in August 1944. Their headstones are arranged in straight lines, divided into four plots, and grouped about an oval pool. At each end of the cemetery is a small garden. On the hillside overlooking the cemetery is the chapel with its wealth of decorative mosaic and large sculptured figures. Between the chapel and the burial area, a bronze relief map recalls military operations in the region. On the retaining wall of the terrace, 294 names of the missing are inscribed. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

17.Sicily, Italy

7861 Americans

sicily

The World War II Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy covers 77 acres, rising in a gentle slope from a broad pool with an island and cenotaph flanked by groups of Italian cypress trees. Beyond the pool is the immense field of headstones of 7,861 of American military war dead, arranged in gentle arcs on broad green lawns beneath rows of Roman pines. The majority of these men died in the liberation of Sicily (July 10 to August 17, 1943); in the landings in the Salerno Area (September 9, 1943) and the heavy fighting northward; in the landings at Anzio Beach and expansion of the beachhead (January 22, 1944 to May 1944); and in air and naval support in the regions.

18.Somme, France

1844  Americans

somme-cemetery

The World War I Somme American Cemetery and Memorial in France is sited on a gentle slope typical of the open, rolling Picardy countryside. The 14.3-acre cemetery contains the graves of 1,844 of our military dead. Most lost their lives while serving in American units attached to British armies, or in operations near Cantigny. The headstones, set in regular rows, are separated into four plots by paths that intersect at the flagpole near the top of the slope. The longer axis leads to the chapel at the eastern end of the cemetery.

19.St. Mihiel, France

4153 Americans

st-mihiel-cemetery

The World War I St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in France, 40.5 acres in extent, contains the graves of 4,153 of our military dead. The majority of these died in the offensive that resulted in the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient that threatened Paris. The burial area is divided by Linden alignment trees and paths into four equal plots. At the center is a large sundial surmounted by an American eagle. To the right (west) is a statue of a World War I soldier and at the eastern end is a semi-circular overlook dominated by a sculpture representing a victory vase.

20. Suresnes, France

1541 Americans

suresnes-cemetery

Originally a World War I cemetery, the Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial just outside Paris, France now shelters the remains of U.S. dead of both wars. The 7.5-acre cemetery contains the remains of 1,541 Americans who died in World War I and 24 Unknown dead of World War II. Bronze tablets on the walls of the chapel record the names of 974 World War I missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

Apologize to no one.

Remind Americans of our sacrifices and don’t confuse arrogance with leadership.

May God Bless America!

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What you have just seen is just one aspect that makes us what we are, and why this republic that became the melting pot of the world is such an enigma to so many.  I am still waiting for an Islamic nation to step up and stop wars and genocide instead of creating them.

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Comments
23 Responses to “A Rebuttal To The Apology Tour”
  1. Wow, DT – to see all of the numbers laid out, the cemeteries, and the many locations in which Americans died abroad fighting the good fight is really staggering. Thank you for this…

  2. Kathy says:

    Diamond I have sent this on and while no words are necessary I did ask those who received this to remember this quote from Obama’s Cairo speech.

    “I consider it part of my responsibility as president of the United States to fight against negative sterotypes of Islam wherever they appear”

  3. David G. says:

    “12. Meuse-Argonne”

    Those graves aren’t anonymous. My Great-Uncle Harold Glance is here. Killed in action October 9, 1918, one month and two days before the war ended.

    I just wanted to put his name on here so that it isn’t forgotten. Although he was born a half century before my generation we still remember.

    If and when the Frogs become fed-up with America they are welcome to send his body home where it belongs. There’s still a place left next to his mother and father. We’ve been saving it for almost 100 years.

  4. Thank you Nancy for the bestest rebuttal to teh usurper evah!

  5. Charlotte says:

    Hi Nancy,

    I have a feeling that, that frog in the pot just can’t seem to feel the heat, even though the coals are burning red hot. Maybe that’s the problem. Some folks like the color RED because they love being taken care just as long as they don’t have to fight.

    Charlotte

  6. Folks,
    You are going to love this! I have been saying for months that this little dictator in waiting (20 some czars and counting as his own personal layer of government with no accountability) is a cross between Hitler and the Caliphs of the Ottoman Empire. Well in keeping with the Greeks, Romans, Caliphs and Hitler – Bambi has his own food taster – because he knows he needs one. (BTW – Hitler had a whole team of tasters.)

    http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.0caa9f66f64d2c5c70c0d8ddb18f1a5b.821&show_article=1

  7. A Rebuttal To The Apology Tour: http://bit.ly/BhPv9

  8. RT. @LogisticMonster A Rebuttal To The Apology Tour: http://bit.ly/BhPv9

  9. Leaping Spark says:

    America has liberated Europe twice! I now ask all of you, when are we going to liberate America? The POS Obama desecrated the Memorials by just setting foot on them, he is not and never will be an American. We are not honoring all of those brave men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for Europe and America by letting this little, arrogant, Communistic Muslim POS remain as POTUS, he must be impeached or forced to resign. The truth is out there it must be found. God bless our Military.

  10. MistieT says:

    Powerful rebuttal to the Obama D-Day speech. I’m humbled & ashamed I hadn’t heard of many of the places listed. http://tinyurl.com/qf7srl

  11. no-nonsence-nancy says:

    I love it about the food taster! It would be funny if after he tastes and then BO eats the guy fakes dropping over dead. BO would die of a heart attach(maybe Bidden,too) and we would be rid of them both. HaHaHa

  12. no-nonsence-nancy says:

    There once was a food taster who tasted
    The food of Obama, head of state
    One day the taster tasted and then Obama ate
    Then the taster dropped dead but it was a fake
    Sadly BO a heart attack did take
    And now we are rid of Obama the rake.

    Sorry friends, I’m a bad poet but I couldn’t resist. Besides it’s very late and I’m giddy. Not from drinking, though.

  13. Kathy says:

    Does this mean we can look forward to a Food Tasting Czar?

  14. I Call BS says:

    I don’t agree with everything expressed here, but I appreciate the list of and info about American cemeteries on foreign soil – it is important to be reminded of the sacrifices our countrymen have made, and their and our our historical support for democracy and freedom abroad. Dwight Call

  15. Frank Bures says:

    I had an honour of attending the wreath-laying ceremony at the Luxembourg cemetery two weeks ago. My father was liberated by Patton’s troops from Dachau concentration camp. So if it were not for Patton, I might not be here.
    I was introduced to Patton’s grand-daughter at the ceremony and it was an absolute highlight of the day.
    I am a Canadian, but I stand (as many Canadians do) by your side.

  16. drkate says:

    Heartfelt gratefulness and thanks for this post.

  17. Best 3 hours I have spent blogging Dr. Kate. You are very welcome!

  18. Polthinkr says:

    This is a reply to no-nonsense-nancy. Wow, did you think about what you just said? If BO and Bidden were out, guess who would take their place??? Speaker of the House of Representatives! UGHH! Nancy Pelosi!!!!! Talk about nightmare….

  19. AnneMarie says:

    I received some of the same photos shown above in an email. Inspired by our President’s “Apology Tour” in Europe, I made this video on Youtube to pay tribute to the “Arrogant Americans” who gave ALL to keep those same Europeans free. My Dad, my hero (Memory Eternal) had the crap kicked out of him in the South Pacific while his brothers were in Europe for 4 1/2 years, long before I was born. We were lucky, they all came home.
    God Bless These “Arrogant Americans” and Thank You!

  20. @glennbeck thought you might like to see something that needs to do to the admin in the WH: http://bit.ly/NDSyZ

  21. JOHN C. TYLER, JR. says:

    My Uncle, Paul Fredrick Tyler, is buried at Lorraine,France Cemetery #10. He was 24 when he was killed. He was my father’s younger brother and he hardly spoke of him. I think it was too painful since my father was exempt from combat due to his war work on radar. I saw the cold letter dated 1945 from the War Department confirming his death. Uncle Paul’s letters from his sweetheart in England were returned to my grandmother who kept them till her death. I read one and cried at a love snuffed out so casually, those “Arrogant Americans”. I wish he was there for me growing up, seeing me as an image of his brother. As proud American who went into the US military when my time came in 1965, but I’m an “Arrogant American” too.
    The blood of those “Arrogant Americans” have washed the soil of many countries through out the world, in the name of freedom. Uncle Paul has a resting place (grave) reserved for him next to his brother if he were to truly come HOME TO AMERICA.

  22. JasperCounty says:

    My mother’s cousin was killed when the troop ship he was on was hit by a kamakazi(?)plane. This was the convoy back to the Phillipines during the Pacific was. Paul was finally buried in southern Illinois and his mother always referred to his casket as “Paul’s box”.

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