Stop Making The Distinction!

There is Eric Holder (Americans are cowardly racists):

http://www.youtube.com/v/2Fy2DnMFwZw&hl=en&fs=1

…and then there is Morgan Freeman:

http://www.youtube.com/v/8J0DJQo0nYo&hl=en&fs=1

Eric Holder is an EXACT SYMPTOM of the problem.

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Comments
23 Responses to “Stop Making The Distinction!”
  1. I am honestly getting sick and tired of hearing about the race thing. Will it ever end? I swear, this election has made the race issue more pronounced than ever.

  2. celestialdragonfly says:

    He’s right we are cowardly, we’ve been attacked from every angle by those of the African American race on what we say and how we say it…because it might be taken as a racial slur or something…We fear the NAACP and the powers that be, people like Al Sharpton just to begin with.
    Then you have people like my husband who dealt with abuse of authority in the military by a first sergeant and a female sergeant in the same unit who were both African American. We’re talking his life was put at risk during the ground war in Kuwait by the female African American sergeant, so sometimes it’s hard not to be jaded.
    You gotta give the guy credit for keeping the fires going! You nailed this one perfectly!!!!

  3. navyvet48 says:

    Morgan Freeman is correct. We are all Americans…we aren’t purple, green, white, black or blue! We are all red, white and blue.

  4. navyvet48 says:

    If we get rid of Black History Month we will still be racists!

  5. Kathy says:

    The problem is too many people gain either politically or financially by picking at the scab.If this was left to heal I believe for the most part it would.

    As long as people benefit by reminding us of this issue it is not going to go away. They might have to find a real job so just keep stirring the pot.

  6. Kathy,

    This was healing before That One came along! Almost everyone I know pretty much lived what Morgan Freeman was talking about. The bigots stood out, and were generally ignored or thought of as wing nuts. Now, thanks to Obama & Co, everyone is all concerned over race and religion and creed and gender again.

    Apparently that’s change you can believe in.

  7. lee M. says:

    Unless we get rid of Black History Month we are making the African American a more important personage than he/she should be. If we continue to set aside a month for them, then we should also have a month for:

    1 – Irish Americans

    2 – Italian Americans

    3 – French Americans

    4 – German Americans

    5 – English Americans

    6 – Swedish Americans

    7 – Ukranian Americans

    8 – Scots Americans

    9 – Russian Americans

    10- Filipino Americans

    11- Mexican Americans

    12- Lithuanian Americans

    13- UH OH I ran out of months, but there are still many other ethnic groups that make up the populace of the United States of America.

    Why should one group be celebrated any more than the other? Already, with the Black History month we would have allocated 14 months of a 12 month year to celebrating various ethnic groups separately, when we should just continuing celebrating them all together on the 4th of July and in this way emphasize the fact that we are ONE AMERICA, INDIVISIBLE.

    Let the tunnel minded like Al Sharpton, Eric Holder, etc. fan their own flames and ignore them.

    As far as I’m concerned, this past election has proven, if nothing else, that most Americans have moved past the race problem. If there are some out there who still want to toot the same old horn, let them. I, for one am not listening to them. The color of you skin means nothing to me. It’s what is in your heart and your mind that matters.

    I believe Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr. would say to them, move on, stop beating a dead horse and start doing something constructive for your country and the youth who are coming behind you to take your place in the scheme of things. All this energy spent on this subject should instead be spent educating the young so that America can keep her place in the world.

    Let this be a color blind America and get on with the business of protecting what our forefathers (black included) fought for.

  8. lee M. says:

    P.S. I inadvertently left out the Native American Indian. These brave people have been neglected in many ways and I truly would be remiss if I did not mention them first and foremost in a comment such as this. Remember, this was their country before it was ours. We owe the Native American Indian a debt of gratitude that will never be completely paid no matter what.

  9. Somewhere, early in the election process, I heard something about creating a racial divide. It would create social unrest. By the powers that be choosing “the one”, this could be accomplished. Who knows…

    As a white person I would like to talk about my white history. When I was a teenager, I attended a racially mixed school in California. I had to ride the bus to and from. The black kids choose to sit in the back of the bus, if you were white and there was one seat in the back, you did not sit down because if you did you suffered being beaten up by the blacks. They were also ubnoxious and obscene. Frankly, they acted like animals. Also, I lived in a racially mixed neighborhood and my brothers were beaten both at school and on the street by blacks. My older brother, just out of the California Highway Patrol Academy was beaten in his from yard by blacks; they broke his nose and he wound up in the ER.

    Now, everyone needs to understand that we never did anything to any black person(s). However, I feel that I and my brothers have been victims of reverse discrimination and worse.

    I am sick and tired of hearing how bad black people have it in this country. I’m tired of walking on egg shells when it comes to black people. I’m tired of feeling guilty for being white.

    If they want racial equally, they should stop playing the race card all the time.

  10. I was an Army brat & lived the first 12 years of my life on bases in NCO housing with just about every different kind of human in the world. Even though my parents were both raised Alabama racists it did not affect my relationships with anyone I attended school with, or with whom I socialized after school.

    In 1966 Dad got his last assignment at Ft. Benning, Georgia, prior to his retirement. We had been there 6 months when Dad got his orders for Viet Nam at which time we moved to Talladega, Alabama where Dad planned to spend his retirement. He never made it home, however.

    The “culture shock” was immensely frightening at first because there were no blacks (or any race besides white) at my first school. Then on to Jr. High where the slow process of integration had started with no problems. About 1970 the federal government decided we weren’t doing it fast enough, so their solution was to close all the black schools and cram every one of us into the already bulging at the seams white schools.

    My sophomore year in high school we were forced into split-shifts. Freshmen & sophomores went in the morning, juniors & seniors in the afternoon. Agitators moved in from the north & a major race riot ensued.

    The government interference by the feds was the sole reason for the riots, helped along by these sudden new Yankee students who were mostly white. A friend’s father was seriously beaten by a gang of blacks on campus one day & all hell broke loose after that.

    I am convinced that the government instigated our problems & then exacerbated them until we fell in line. Whites did all the giving & blacks did all the taking, and at the risk of sounding racist now, that is still the way it is. The black race was given “entitlement” then, and all following generations have grown up believing that they are also entitled to everything the government has to offer. I firmly believe if the feds had left us alone race relations would be much better now.

    Thanks for the post, Diamond. Also, thanks Lee, for remembering part of my ancestry. I was ready to scold you for leaving out the Natives of this great land.

    God bless America!

  11. Lee – thanks for remembering the true native americans.

    As for racism in my personal life; both my parents were racist and I was not and am not even though I am considered a 6th class citizen behind white men, black men, black women, hawaiian men, and hawaiian women. Go figure – life is too short.

    Hele Mai!

  12. No one who follows this blog thinks of you as a 6th class anything.

    You rock, & don’t you ever forget it!

    God bless America, where ever she lands!

  13. Stacy says:

    It’s a little disturbing to hear the “6th class” distinction coming from you DT. Granted, there are extremes here just as there are anywhere else in the Country but Hawai’i (with the exception of Kaua’i perhaps) has always been ethnic / gender tolerant. The key was how you approached sharing the beauty with everybody else. My great-grandparents, grandparents and parents were very concious of distinctions, but never in a mean-spirited way. Being of mixed ethnicity and growing up with kids of every shape, size and persuasion we referred to ethnicity but never in a derrogatory manner. Even with the military presence the white – black racial thing was not a part of my world until college on the continent. Population change has brought this sentiment home to Hawai’i and that saddens me because it can and is becoming a pervasive thing.

    I apologize for the rant but to me you are just another kama’aina trying to make it work in paradise, just like me and everybody else. You know what it’s like DT, ‘Hawaiian Style’ when we need to come together, we do and otherwise we’re thinking about the kids, the old folks, fishing, tending to the garden…

  14. Stacy – I think it’s this island. I have not ever experienced what I experience here on any of the other islands. I was told a few years back it is because of the red hair.

  15. Stacy – one more thing. My hubby is native american and he gets the same treatment.

  16. One last thing. I don’t think of myself as a 6th class person even though I am reminded daily (and not bitchin or feeling sorry for myself). It just is what it is – so when the whole race card issue came to light during the election, I was VERY aware immediately.

    Stacy – I swear it’s something about the chaos energy of this island with the volcano.

  17. Stacy says:

    I was born and raised on the eastern side of that island and I’ll tell you there was always something about the west side that was odd. Hang in there and know that I love you sister. Besides, back in the day red hair was a true sign that you were a tita and like any minority we work harder and achieve more because we try.

  18. SFIndie says:

    I’m a little late commenting here, but wanted to add another “month” – Japanese American month. We did, after all, put them in concentration camps and confiscate everything they owned. They should at least get their own history month.

    We can’t forget Chinese-Americans. They are responsible for building America’s railroads in the west, and were treated pretty much like slaves. They surely need their own history month.

    And I’m not sure which history month would be mine. Ukranian-American? My grandparents were all from what’s now the Ukraine. Or Jewish-American? Oh wait, that’s not on the list.

    Maybe we need to assign weeks instead of months. So many ethnic groups to recognize for what they contributed to the building of this country.

  19. suek says:

    >>We owe the Native American Indian a debt of gratitude that will never be completely paid no matter what.>>

    Ummmmm…could you elaborate on that a bit, please?

  20. Suek – thanks for leaving a comment and dropping that link all over. Will you be joining us this evening?

  21. ILBlue says:

    Sorry I couldn’t figure out what you are talking about Diamond Tiger 6th class citizen? Are you Hawaiian? (sp?)

    But I liked the topic and have always liked Morgan Freeman. I can’t for the life of me figure out what in the world compelled Holder to say what he did.

    It just seems apparent that so many AA now feel they have a free pass to express “hate” talk against all “White” people . Strange how they came out with the new “Hate crimes” bill just last year. Don’t think it counts to show hate against “white” people though.

    Strange how it took until this past year for me to realize for the first time I have never and my family has never done anything to desire being treated badly for things that occurred many years ago and not in the 1900’s either.

    Race relations are definately going backwards. All the hard work and efforts of many in the past and up until now has been very much diminished by Obama and the daily negativity from AA in MSM and the like.

    I’ve always tried to treat people the same no matter what . but I have to say I now feel under a daily attack for being “white”. Strange since I always tried to treat others the way I wanted to be treated . It is becoming a very divisive time in our history. And that truly makes me sad. And it certainly is nothing to be proud of.

    For those of you from Hawaii, I’m surely jealous and envious. How is your economy doing? The 1 and only time I was there was Kuaui. And that was 20 yrs ago and I wished I could have stayed forever. But groceries were too high . Was there off season in June. Beautiful and peaceful. Especially since we stayed at private A-frame and went to deserted beaches.

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